Topics

Accounting Advertising Advisor Analysis Balance Sheet Barriers to Entry Beachhead Benefits Better Books Brainstorming Brainwriting Budget Business Flow Business Model Cash Flow Commercialization Communications Competition Competitive Advantage Consultant Corporate Entrepreneurship CQs Creativity Critical Success Factor Culture Customer Decisions Deploy Design Develop Differentiation DXpedition Earn EBITDA Education Effectiveness Elevator Pitch Entrepreneur Entrepreneurship Environment Evolution Executive Summary Exercise Expenses Expertise Failure Finance Financial Objectives Flowchart Focus Funding Fuzzy-to-Firm GizmoGadget Glossary Goals Habits Healthy Venture Hiring HOTI Chart Hypothesis Ideas Ideation Income Statement Industry Industry Research Innovation Innovator Intellectual Property Internet Intrapreneurship Invention Inventory Investor Iteration Knowledge Launch Leadership Lean Startup Learning Legal Luck Machines Management Manpower Market Research Marketing Marketing Brochure Material Media Mentor Methods Mindset Mission Mistakes Money Myths Name Niche Market Objectives Operating Agreement Operations Opportunity Passion Patents People Planning Positioning PR Presentations Price Problems Process Flow Product Development Profit Progress Promotion Prototype Publicity Questions Refine Research Resources Return on Investment Roadmap Sales SCAMPER SCORE Scorecard Skills Slides Solution Development Solutions Something SPLUCK Start-up Stimulation Strategies Strategy Structure Success SWOTT Tactics Tagline Target Market Team Teamwork Technology Readiness Levels Terminology Thinking Tools Transformation TRL Validation Value Venture Venture Capital Venture Creation Venture Plan Vision Work Worth Writing

Tips for Writing

  1. Be ruthless when proofreading ... look for what you can cut.
  2. Remember stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end.
  3. Use "talking headings" to convey meaning.
  4. When in doubt, check for rules of grammar and usage with a handbook.
  5. Place the subject and main verb near each other and use strong verb.
  6. Avoid the "to be" verb when a stronger verb carriers a more specific meaning.
  7. Use the passive voice sparingly (It was decided to change the Company name for the sake of enhancing the effect.) vs. (We changed the company name to make it more powerful.)
  8. Make sure the "ing" form is necessary: (We were working on a prototype) vs. (We developed ... ) Note: often a question of verb tense.
  9. Make sure words ending in "'ion" are necessary; are they verbs masquerading as nouns? (The decision to acknowledge receipt of the letter was made.) vs. (We acknowledge receipt of the letter.)
  10. Make certain the prepositional phrase is helpful ... cut wasted prepositional phrases
  11. To tighten: circle the "to be" verbs, the "ing" words, the "ion' words, and prepositions. Then read out loud, and check to see what else you can cut.
  12. Put old information first, new information second (OLD >> NEW)
  13. Put easy-to-understand information first, complicated material second
  14. When building transitions, use repetition of key terms, synonyms for key terms, appropriate pronoun reference, and the appropriate collocation chain
  15. Make sure your pronoun usage is clear to the reader
  16. Choose the best word, but avoid using thoughtless thesaurus words
  17. When quoting, introduce the author, the text, and the concept; then provide the quotation with proper citation format; then provide the reader with your interpretation.
  18. Keep your writing simple ... cut to the chase.
  19. Avoid cliches and trite phrases.
  20. Use strong verbs.
  21. Use consistent verb tenses, and find the single most correct word.
  22. Always look for what you can throwaway and always make it easier on your audience.
[Thank you, Randy Accetta]